Havasu Falls it’s located in a remote canyon of Arizona and is like an oasis of stunning beauty that comes from  rocks. This waterfall becoming the most photographed waterfall in the world.
This place seems cut from a fairytale book because the photos taken does not seem to be natural. Seems worked in Photoshop, when in fact it is just the miracle of Mother Nature. If you go to Havasu Falls, you will no doubt think you are somewhere in Hawaii.

Havasu Falls

Havasu Falls

The blue-green waterfalls of Havasu Falls are among Mother Nature’s greatest works.  Havasu is one of four major waterfalls in the heart of the Havasupai Tribe’s homeland.  Navajo, Mooney, and Beaver Falls are also located in this beautiful canyon, each with their own unique beauty.

The green-blue water color of Havasu falls

The green-blue water color of Havasu falls

So beautiful the blue-green color combination

So beautiful the blue-green color combination

Many visitors to the Grand Canyon do not know about Havasu Falls, the spectacular series of waterfalls in the western canyon. These waterfalls rival any tropical paradise in the world, and they are truly an anomaly in the desert southwest. The water from Havasu Creek that spills over these magnificent falls eventually makes its way to the Colorado River.  Havasu is world-renowned for the unique color of its water, a captivating blue-green that is the result of high levels of travertine, a type of limestone.

The hike to Havasu Falls begins at Hualapai Hilltop, about 100 miles from the nearest town of Seligman. Many people stay at Seligman the night before hiking into Havasu, then get up early and drive to the hilltop. The first 1.5 miles of the hike is a steep descent down to the bottom of Hualapai Canyon (1000 ft. elevation loss). Remember this descent because you will have to go back up it when you climb back out of the canyon (at the end of a long 10 mile hike). The rest of the hike is mostly flat (6.5 miles to the village, or 8.5 miles to the campground). It is an absolutely beautiful hike along the bottom of Hualapai Canyon, an amazing experience hiking through a steep canyon with the cliffs towering above you. But it is also a long hike. It seemed that the canyon was never-ending.

Hike to Havasu Falls

Hike to Havasu Falls

Eventually though, you will reach Havasu Creek. From there it is about a 1.5 mile hike to the village of Supai. Havasu Creek is one of the most beautiful creeks, with amazingly clear blue-green waters. The name “Havasupai” means “people of the blue-green waters”, and it is easy to see where this name comes from.

the indian village of Supai

the indian village of Supai

Havasu Falls is a 2 mile hike past the village, located just before the campground. It is a beautiful double waterfall along Havasu Creek, falling into a crystal clear pool, perfect for swimming on a hot day. There is a large beach area for lounging and picniking in front of the waterfall. You can also get to the top of the waterfall and look down (but be careful). There is something very alluring about this waterfall. It is one you just have to see to believe.

How to get to Havasu falls

Havasu Falls and the other waterfalls near Supai are all located on the Havasupai Indian Reservation, in a remote canyon offshoot of the Grand Canyon. The small village of Supai is home to about 450 Havasupai, whose main industry is now tourism. You will need permission from the Havasupai to hike into the village. In 2003, the entrance fee cost was $20 per person. A room at the lodge is $75 (single) or $80 (double). The campground is $10 per person. If hiking into the village is too much for you, you can also ride a horse (or have your heavy packs brought in by horse), or you can even take a helicopter into the village.

Unlike most waterfalls in Arizona, the ones along Havasu Creek are good year-round. That is because Havasu Creek flows from a spring, and has constant flow throughout the year. So you can come here anytime without worry that the waterfall will be great. However, if you come in the winter months, you could get a lot of rain and cold weather. And in the summer, it will be very hot (+100F in the valley), and July-August is monsoon season (and this is an area for flash floods). We recommend March-April as the best time of year to go here to beat the heat and crowds of summer.

The Havasupai people seem to be generally quiet and reserved. Some people have said that they are unfriendly or resentful of tourists. They always responded with a “hello”, and they are not unfriendly. Some of the people were genuinely outgoing and friendly to tourists, others were just quiet.